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Types of Brows Brushes and Lips Brushes

Sep 08, 2017

Types of Brows Brushes and Lips Brushes


Spoolie

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Also known as: eyebrow brush, lash brush, spoolie wand

Use it for: grooming and shaping eyebrows

 

Your eyes deceive you: this is no mascara wand. It’s designed specifically for the eyebrows, where it makes quick work of brushing brow hairs into place and applying brow gel. When used after lining and filling, it can soften the color so it looks more like your natural eyebrows. It also works just as well for removing mascara clumps from the lashes.

Brow and Lash Comb

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Also known as: lash/brow groomer, lash comb and brow brush

Use it for: shaping and grooming brows and separating lashes after mascara application

 

Use the bristle side to shape and groom the eyebrows or to blend brow color for a more natural appearance. The comb side can also be used to groom brows, though it’s especially good at separating mascara-darkened lashes, removing any clumps in the process.

 

 

Angled Eyebrow Brush

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Also known as: slanted eyebrow brush

Use it for: defining and filling in brows

 

This brush looks nearly identical to the angled eyeliner brush (which you technically could use for the same purpose) with one difference: brow brushes are made with stiff, densely packed natural bristles. This stiffness makes it easier to apply heavier color underneath the brows. Use the slant to your advantage: holding the brush at a 45-degree angle works well for shading, while a 90-degree angle is great for creating precise lines.

 

Lip Brush

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Also known as: lipstick brush, precision lip brush

Use it for: controlled application of lipstick and lip liner

 

This pointed brush plays a number of roles. If you use lip liner, the brush’s precise, tapered bristles can blend the line inward and create a more natural-looking base for lipstick or gloss. You can also use the brush to apply lip color itself: after coating the bristles in color, apply it to the lips in thin layers. Start from the center and work your way out, so as not to overpower the corners with too much color.